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Industry Insight

Top Fall Hazards for Truckers and Motorists

Fall in New England brings more than just tourists. The changing leaves may be beautiful, but they can also be quite dangerous. When slippery, leaves can make road conditions similar to that of driving on ice. Wet or frozen leaves on the roadway can cause trucks to lose traction and skid. If a thick blanket of leaves cover the road, it can become difficult for motorists and truck drivers to distinguish the lane lines and other road markings. Potholes can also be covered by leaves, making it more difficult for truck drivers to avoid them. Aside from creating obstacles on the road, wet leaves can also get stuck on windshields and underneath the wipers obstructing the view of the driver.

To mitigate this risk, truck drivers and drivers in general should reduce their speed when there are an abundance of leaves on the ground. This will allow for a greater following distance between trucks and other vehicles on the road while also making accelerating and decelerating easier. With the added traffic of the “leaf peepers” and slippery leaves, fall can be a dangerous season for all drivers.

Extreme sun glare also adds to the dangerous driving conditions in autumn. It makes it almost impossible to see the road ahead and results in an increased risk of accidents at certain times of the day. The sun cannot be avoided but there are things drivers can do to stay out of harm’s way. Truck drivers are encouraged to keep a pair of quality sunglasses in the truck at all times. Be sure that the vehicle’s headlights are also functioning properly. In addition to shorter days, fall brings crisp, cooler weather, bright blue skies, and sudden (sometimes unexpected) changes in the weather. As the sun goes down and the temperature drops, rain can quickly turn to ice. Less sunlight and icy rain can be a deadly combination. Fog can be another weather related hazard, in which low beams should be used to aim the beam of light down onto the roadway. Truck drivers have a responsibility to check the weather report every time they set out on the roadways, but there are always unforeseen weather and seasonal threats related to safety.

A basic maintenance checklist for winter weather helps to minimize damage to trucks:

  • Battery: Check the battery regularly. It can drain more quickly during cold weather and be more difficult to charge. A handheld battery tester can be used to measure the voltage. If the battery is past its expiration date, it should be replaced.
  • Diesel Fuel: Cold weather can cause diesel fuel to become waxy. Using a blend with a high cetane rating and anti-gel additives can prevent this every time the tank is filled.
  • Cooling System: Truck drivers should pressure test the coolant after letting the engine cool. It should be at 15 to 18 PSI after turning on the heat control valves.
  • Fuel Filter and Water Separator: This should be checked everyday and drained when the fluid is full.
  • Engine Block Heater: Diesel engines can be more difficult to start in cold weather. Consider using an electric engine block heater.
  • Air Dryer: This keeps the water out of brake lines, it is important that it is working properly so that water does not get into the brake lines and freeze.
  • Tire Pressure: Cold weather can reduce tire pressure. This can impact the tread life of tires, fuel economy, and driver safety.

Also, consider creating an emergency kit for breakdowns in the winter. The kit should include extra warm clothing, blankets, a flashlight, first-aid kit, non-perishable food items, water, flares, a bag of salt or sand, chains, a windshield scraper, and extra windshield washer fluid.

More questions about trucker driver safety and preparedness on the road? Unsure about how to dispose of antifreeze and other chemicals frequently used in the winter months? Please give us a call at (603) 623-7933 or visit our website at pinardwaste.com.

Industry Insight

The Problem of Restaurant and Home Food Waste

Food Waste in The United States

Food waste is a huge problem across the United States. According to the USDA, food waste in the U.S. is estimated at between 30-40 percent of the food supply. In 2010, this translated to 133 billion pounds and $161 billion worth of food. This staggering amount of waste has a severe impact on our society as many families and individuals in-need go hungry everyday. Access to nutritious foods is limited for lower class families while billions of pounds of food get wasted every year.

Let’s Talk Environmental Impacts

Not only does food waste have an impact on society, it also puts a strain on the environment. Valuable resources like water and farmland are being misused and wasted every time food is thrown out. When food ends up in a landfill, the nutrients in that food will never return to the soil like it should naturally. This can be compared to putting food in a plastic bag, tying a knot, and burying it. The decomposition of the organic material in a landfill creates Methane gas and other hazardous waste. Composting is a great alternative if food is being thrown away. It is able to bring the nutrients from food back into soil and doesn’t create harmful chemicals.

Reducing Food Waste At Home

It could seem like an obvious answer, but the best way to reduce food waste is to not generate it in the first place. This goes for all waste, but food waste especially can be avoided. For many of us, food waste has simply become a habit. Buying more takeout, making larger portions than we can eat, and even practicing new recipes over the pandemic can all be rationalized. One way to intentionally stop food waste is to plan out your meals with a thorough shopping list (and sticking to it). Hold off on those impulse buys! This can help you save money and waste less food.

Another big contributor to food waste is avoiding oddly shaped or slightly bruised produce in the grocery store. They are oftentimes thrown away based on rather arbitrary cosmetic standards but are (for the most part) fine! Mature fruits and veggies can be frozen or used for smoothies, juices, soups, and desserts. Unlike the “use-by” date, products are typically still safe to eat after the “best before” date so if an “use-by” date is approaching, bring it home and try to make something with it. While it might sound a bit cliché, food connects all of us. Read more about food production in your community and intentionally try to renew your relationship with the food you consume by knowing more about the process that goes into growing it.

Food Waste Contributions From Restaurants?

You can probably imagine that restaurants throw out a significant amount of food every single day. The cheeseburger or stack of pancakes you didn’t quite finish will likely end up in a landfill. According to the World Wildlife Fund, the restaurant industry spends an estimated $162 billion every year in costs related to wasted food. Because The United States is known for rather large portion sizes, we waste more than other countries with similar sized populations. Taking home any leftovers (bringing your own tupperware is a bonus) or sharing with someone else can drastically decrease your food waste when going out to eat. Restaurants are more and more turning to composting to mitigate the amount of waste going to landfills, but as individuals, we can still do our part.

Company Articles, Industry Insight

New Hampshire Recycling Laws and Regulations: What You Should Know

Recycling Requirements

There is no federal law in the U.S. that absolutely mandates recycling. State and local governments are left with the difficult task of introducing recycling requirements and implementing a successful recycling program on their own. There are currently 25 states that have mandatory recycling requirements including states like Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Texas, Washington, and California.

If state governments don’t mandate recycling, some local governments require businesses to show proof of recycling. Staying up to date with the latest landfill bans, waste laws, and other recycling statutes and regulations can help businesses to save money while lowering their carbon footprint.

New Hampshire’s Recycling Regulations

While New Hampshire follows federal hazardous waste regulations, the state has its own recycling rules for recycling facilities. The state’s Department of Environmental Services (DES) encourages the recycling of plastic bottles, white goods (appliances), glass, plastics, aluminum containers, steel cans, scrap metal, motor vehicle batteries, and tires. The state currently bans video display devices from state landfills and incinerators. Although NH’s Solid Waste Management Act does not establish waste reduction or recycling as mandatory practices, it does encourage the management of wastes in accordance with the Waste Management Hierarchy.

Source reduction lies at the top of the hierarchy to prevent waste from being generated in the first place. This can be practiced by buying second-hand or using something until you physically can’t anymore. This prevents more of something from being made in the first place. Practices like source reduction prevent waste from being generated, resulting in less waste needing end-of-life management, conservation of resources, and an overall cutback in environmental impacts. Simply don’t buy something new just because you can.

If waste is being created, the next steps are to recycle, reuse, and compost if applicable. These practices are self-explanatory and have been preached to us while learning about sustainability. But other practices like turning waste to energy, incinerations, and landfills are usually left out of the lesson plans. These being the least preferred methods are more harmful for our planets and atmosphere. Ideally, if we have waste, we would want to turn that waste into energy to use up every bit of what we can. If we can’t do that successfully, incineration allows us to get rid of materials by burning them so they don’t take up space when they aren’t being used any longer.

Last and very much least, are landfills. They take up space and are hard to contain properly, but are still a very important part of our waste management process. Some landfills can be used to turn waste-to-energy. Others are solely a vessel to contain trash in one place. When done properly, landfills can break down trash, contain hazardous gases and liquids, and ultimately be turned into something useful (like golf courses or parks).

Download Our What-Is-What Trash Recycling Quick Sheet

Company Articles, Industry Insight

What Most People Don’t Know About Dumpsters

Dumpster rental might seem straightforward at first. You make a call, the dumpster is delivered, and you fill it with discarded items. There are a few extra things to keep in mind when ordering a dumpster for your business or home.

Dumpster Basics

There are a lot of facts about dumpsters that are not common knowledge. Overall, dumpsters can range in size from ten to up to forty feet. Typically ten to twenty feet is suitable for a small to medium-sized renovation, demolition job, or a major seasonal cleaning. The smaller dumpsters are mostly used for residential projects as they can be easily delivered and fit in a driveway or backyard. Larger dumpsters can be used for bigger demolition jobs, or for commercial projects.

Fees you can expect for dumpster rentals include both pick-up and drop-off, a daily rental rate, a fuel surcharge, and tonnage (how much you pay per ton of garbage thrown away). Pinard provides dumpsters for short-term rentals for those timely projects (anything under six months). Other fees can be added if you need more space and need a second dumpster, or for additional pick-up of bulkier materials.

Location of Container

Location matters! Pinard trucks have an overhead clearance limit of 14 feet. This prevents us from delivering containers larger than 10 yards (30 feet) due to low hanging tree branches and electrical wires. Trucks cannot be driven over underground septic or sprinkler systems. Paved surfaces could crack from the weight of a heavy dumpster. The area around and in front of your container should be plowed and heavily sanded during the winter months. These factors impact the location of the dumpster. It needs to be easily accessible and away from dangerous material. Please place your dumpster somewhere safe for you and our employees.

Loading Your Dumpster

Please be watchful of items fitting securely inside of the container so that nothing is protruding from the dumpster. This helps to ensure the safety of our employees and those around the container, while controlling the hassles of pests and odors. You may find that you are generating more material than the dumpster can safely and effectively hold. It is easy to schedule an additional service request online or call our office directly at (603) 623-7933.

Prohibited Items

Certain items are prohibited from being disposed of in dumpsters. A special pickup can be scheduled for any items that require special handling. If you have any questions about whether or not an item is acceptable, please contact us first and we will either schedule a pickup or direct you on how to properly dispose of the item. Items that include special handling include, but are not limited to:

  • liquid waste
  • tires and batteries
  • flammables/corrosives/toxics/compressed gases
  • televisions and computer monitors
  • motor oil, oil filters
  • any appliance containing freon (refrigerators, air conditioners)
  • yard waste
  • fluorescent lamps
  • propane tanks
  • asbestos
  • paint/paint thinner
  • medical waste
  • hazardous waste/pesticides
  • construction/demolition debris

Bulky items like furniture also require special handling.
For Pinard’s specific dumpster sizes please click here.

For more information on Pinard Waste Systems Dumpster rentals, reach out by filling out the forms on our website, or call us at (603) 623-7933. Each dumpster rental service is unique for state requirements and waste management companies. So before you do anything, ask questions and do your research because safety is key!

Industry Insight

Impact of Hurricane Season on Waste and Recycling

How does hurricane season impact the waste management industry?

As early as June, hurricanes can develop in the Atlantic and form as late as November. Accompanied by the unpredictable nature of hurricane season, a natural disaster could strike New England at any moment, with peak season taking place mid-August to mid-September. A bad storm can result in an excessive buildup of waste and debris from storm related damage.

But how do we limit the damage?

Due to the unpredictability of these storms – preparation is key. First and foremost, hazardous waste should be prioritized over other types of waste, like yard or household waste. Improperly secured hazardous waste can combust, causing damage and/or contamination, putting local companies out of operations for potential extended periods of time. If you know a storm is coming, secure hazardous waste in a safe area or dispose of it properly before the bad weather.

When a storm is expected, the foremost thing that municipal solid waste (MSW) companies do is put the safety of haulers, other industry workers, and members of the community impacted by this disruption first. They will be the first wave of people out after (or during) a storm. Communication can become difficult during post-storm cleanup efforts so it is important for communities to understand the clean-up role that waste and recycling companies step into during a weather related event.

How do you prepare for hurricane season?
How does preparation impact waste?

Before hurricane season, it is recommended to cut back trees and weak branches that could potentially make contact with structures, resulting in damage. Once a storm watch has been issued, solid waste materials (garbage or recycling containers, uncollected garbage, recycling, yard waste or bulk waste) should be placed in a location away from high winds. Ideally this would be inside a building or a locked waste structure attached to your home. Waste collection services may be suspended after the storm, but it remains beneficial to separate normal household garbage from storm debris during the clean-up process. This will ensure the efficiency of residential collection when resumed.

Disaster debris typically includes soils and sediments, vegetation (trees, limbs, shrubs), loose municipal solid waste (common household garbage, personal belongings), construction and demolition debris (is some instances, entire structures and their contents), vehicles, food waste, “white goods” (refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners), and household hazardous waste (cleaning agents, pesticides, pool chemicals, gasoline, etc). Each type of waste may contain or be contaminated with toxic or hazardous ingredients.

With that being said, it is important to be prepared for a storm and listen to your waste management company for guidance. No matter where in the world you are, natural disasters are inevitable, but by being prepared and helping out when you’re needed, the people that are there to service your community can do that effectively and efficiently.

To learn more about what to do with waste before or after a storm, reach out to us at (603) 623-7933 or contact your local waste management company.

Industry Insight

What to Teach Your Kids About Recycling

1. Not knowing is okay!

Don’t be afraid to tell your kids you are unsure. Just because you are unsure about an item, doesn’t mean you are at a loss. We have knowledge at our fingertips— literally at our fingertips. A quick internet search can keep you educated. Teaching your kids to stay educated is huge for the sustainability movement. Whether you’re unsure about the recyclability of certain materials, laws in place, and new sustainable technology, it is always good to do your research and show your kids how to too. Another resource is calling your waste management company directly. What’s important is that you sort items correctly and doing 5 minutes worth of research can save hours of sorting in the future.

2. No plastic bags...EVER

Plastic bags can’t and will never be recyclable. Maybe that’s why every household has a stash of plastic bags inside other plastic bags hiding somewhere in a drawer or closet. This also means that anything inside a plastic bag meant for recycling, has to also be thrown out when it gets to the facility. So put your recyclables loose in a bin and toss those plastic bags into the trash (or in your stash).

3. Don’t recycle anything smaller than a dollar bill

Any recyclable item that is smaller than a dollar bill becomes too small to be sorted correctly at the waste management facility. This includes straws, bottle caps, k-cups, paper clips, etc. Especially something like a bottle cap, it can stop and start the sorting process a few times a day! If the bottle cap is put back on the bottle, it can be sorted with the bottle. It is important to note that all waste management companies are different and have different processes in place so double check before recycling something new.

4. Empty, Clean, Dry

Before tossing something into the recycling bin, make sure it is empty, clean, and dry. If you want to recycle a pizza box, make sure all the leftovers are out of it and there are no grease stains. How clean does it have to be? Clean enough where you would feel comfortable using it again for something else. For example, if you are cleaning out a peanut butter jar that is made out of recyclable material, make sure it is clean enough to where you feel comfortable putting something besides peanut butter in it next time.

4. It doesn’t end with recycling!

Recycling is only the beginning when it comes to sustainability. There are so many other things to be aware of and to teach your kids. Recycling is only the tip of the iceberg, so when you are teaching the next generation how to properly recycle, you don’t stop there.

For more information on how to properly recycle head to www.waste360.com or give us a call at (603)-623-7933.

Download Our What-Is-What Trash Recycling Quick Sheet

Industry Insight

Wish-cycling Won’t Come True

What is “Wish-cycling”?
“Wish-cycling is the process of placing items into the recycling bin even when there’s little to no chance for their recovery” (https://discardstudies.com). Some common wish-cycled products include soiled pizza boxes, waxed milk cartons, and mixed plastics.

Why do people do this?
People ‘wish-cycle’ when they’re unsure how to properly dispose of a product in the hopes it will be recycled. Throwing something in the trash or in a recycling bin helps individuals relieve guilt they feel when using tossable products. People often think that recycling is immediately better than putting something in the trash. But, contaminating a recycling bin is irresponsible.

Why is this a problem?
When you incorrectly recycle, you disrupt or stop the whole recycling process. This disrupts and slows down the recycling process because a human has to sift through the waste. When a pickup is contaminated, it completely stops the process until sifted properly.

How to avoid this

Recycling can be easy! Don’t be afraid to use resources to check to ensure you are properly recycling including:

  • Call your local waste management company: (603) 623-7933 in the New Hampshire, Southern Maine, and Northern Mass areas
  • In your home, print out signs and tape them above recycling bins for a friendly reminder
  • Distribute pamphlets in your local area to educate community on how to properly dispose of each item

Download Our What-Is-What Trash Recycling Quick Sheet

Industry Insight

Less Is More

Ordering online is a fast and efficient way to get necessities sent directly to your doorstep, but it comes with a price. It negatively impacts the environment due to the use of plastic, excess cardboard, and styrofoam. We’ve all been there – you order online and the product comes in a box 4x the size, filled to the top with bubble wrap and packing peanuts. You spend minutes digging through the box, only to spend more time forcing the packaging to open.

One way to reduce your carbon footprint is to consciously purchase products online that have a more sustainable packaging approach. Companies can make their packaging more sustainable by doing the following:

  1. Make their packaging out of recyclable material
  2. Biodegradable packaging
  3. Allow consumers to opt out of packaging

Recycled & Recyclable

Although the product may need to be packaged to get to you, leveraging recycled materials can make a huge impact. If packaging material was made out of recycled material, companies would save money by eliminating excess packaging. Once large corporations take the step to become more conscious with their packaging, there will be a proactive shift in the sustainability movement.

One company making strides in their sustainability initiative is Gillette and Gillette Venus. Procter & Gamble (P&G) has set a goal of making their company more sustainable by 2030, initiated by making their packaging out of recycled cardboard and plastic. According to P&G, this pivot alone will save over 545 tons of plastic each year.

Biodegradable

One large development made in the last few years was the substitution of biodegradable packing peanuts for styrofoam. Styrofoam takes years to degrade, which makes it a material that lasts longest in landfills. Packing peanuts efficiently protects packages while having less of an impact on the environment– it’s a win-win.

Another biodegradable alternative is cornstarch. This has become a great alternative to plastic packaging because it is compostable. When cornstarch was first introduced, it was more expensive, but nowadays its price is comparable to plastic. From a cost perspective, this is an incentive for larger corporations to make the switch. Cutting costs while also working to improve a company’s corporate responsibility– it’s another win-win.

Minimal Packaging

Some companies, when you are checking out of their website, will allow you to opt into a minimal packaging option. For example, Glossier has an option for customers to select ‘less packaging’ during checkout. By clicking this box, you’ll receive fewer promotional products that typically clutter the order, making the product more sustainable.

Packaging is an easy way for companies to start becoming more sustainable. In 2021, sustainability is in. Companies making conscious efforts to eliminate waste are attracting an eco-conscious customer base.

As sustainability becomes more important to the average individual, companies either need to catch up or quit while they are ahead. With online ordering the primary Gen-Z consumers shop, practicing sustainable packaging will make or break a company moving forward. Get ahead of the curve and use more recyclable packaging.

Industry Insight

Are Landfills Good or Bad?

Well it depends.

It depends on a few factors:
The types of waste being dumped in landfills
How good the containment technology is at that landfill
Whether the landfill uses eco-friendly waste to energy technology

There are good and bad landfills just like how anything, when done incorrectly, can be harmful.


Type of Waste

The type of waste put in landfills matters. If organic material is buried in a landfill, the process to break it down is called anaerobic digestion. It is important to keep organic matter out of trash and landfills. This is because as organic matter decomposes, it releases greenhouses gases like methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. These gases are not contained and are instead released into the atmosphere, warming our planet and adding to climate change.


Containment Technology

Landfills need to be well contained to prevent contamination. Landfills have liners around them to contain gases and liquids from leaving the landfill area. Think of it as a giant trash bag under ground that keeps everything in one place. If the lining isn’t installed properly or even malfunctions, it can be devastating to surrounding communities.

When rain mixes with chemicals in landfill waste, it creates a toxic substance called leachate. This substance can penetrate the landfill lining and contaminates nearby water sources and soil. To ensure surrounding wildlife and society is unaffected, it is imperative to build landfills with correct containment technology.


Waste to Energy Technology

When trash is incinerated it creates greenhouse gases as well. Instead of being released into the atmosphere, landfill companies can harness these gases and turn it into energy. To do this safely, the incineration must be done in a combustion chamber so the gas released from it can be contained. Then the gas and heat released is sent to a turbine generator for electricity. To prevent further contamination, the ash that is left over is dampened to reduce dust and hauled off in trucks. The trucks take the ash to a landfill suited for ash that prevents water contamination.

Depending on these factors, are landfills good or bad? There are still other contextual factors needed to determine the right answer.

Like:

  • What is the economic position of the country?
  • What surrounds the landfill?
  • What other sustainable measures are being taken?
  • What would be done if landfills didn’t exist?

There will always be pros and cons for waste removal. What you can do is ask questions, question authority, and remember sustainability starts in your home.

Industry Insight

Can You Recycle Broken Glass?

Things happen, glasses break, plates shatter, but the most important thing you can do is  dispose of it properly.

It may make sense that because you can recycle glass jars and containers that you would be able to recycle broken glass, but you cannot.

Broken glass cannot be recycled for a number of reasons. First and foremost, it is unsafe. It can be harmful to whoever is handling your recycling, whether it be you, a partner, a waste collector, or a worker at the recycling center. Disposing of broken glass correctly is essential in keeping everyone around you safe.

Overall, broken glass can be damaging to the whole recycling operation. Most recycling centers are not equipped with machinery that can pick out the small pieces of glass so there is no way to remove tiny shards of glass from other recyclables. In addition, larger shards of broken glass can poke holes in the operation… literally. They are sharp and can cause harm to the items that we are able to recycle.

To keep everyone safe and maintain an effective recycling operation, let’s keep broken glass out of our recycling centers!


How you should dispose of broken glass:

Step 1: You should avoid picking up the pieces with your bare hands and make sure to wear shoes when cleaning up the glass.

Step 2: Sweep all of the broken glass into a container. This can be a brown paper bag or anything that the glass will not rip through easily.

Step 3: Seal the bag or container with tape or staples so the small glass shards cannot escape.

Step 4: Label the bag or container with the words “BROKEN GLASS” so whoever handles it next will be aware of the potentially harmful items inside.

Step 5: Place the container in the trash.

Other alternatives to just throwing out your broken glass includes contacting your local bottle bank and seeing if they will accept it. You would have to do your research, but they might dispose of broken glass for you. If you are unsure of how to dispose of something, contact us at (603) 623-7933 or refer to the residential recycling page on our website. 

Industry Insight

When Recycling Isn’t Enough

Many people believe that when they take small steps toward sustainability, whether they recycle or dabble in shopping second-hand, that their sustainability journey is done there. But that shouldn’t be the case. According to the EPA, one person, on average, creates 4.9 lbs of waste a day (EPA.gov).

The EPA also states that in 2018, Americans created 292.4 million tons of solid waste. Out of all the solid waste, around 69 million tons were recycled, 25 million tons were composted, totaling almost 94 million tons of solid waste either recycled or composted. This resulted in only a 32.1% recycling and composting rate. It is estimated that around 17.7 million tons of food were managed by other methods, resulting in 146 million tons of solid waste landfilled (https://www.epa.gov/facts-and-figures-about-materials-waste-and-recycling/national-overview-facts-and-figures-materials#NationalPicture). If a handful of households made conscious decisions to decrease their solid waste millions of tons of solid waste would not end up in landfills.

Making small conscious decisions about your waste output is  a step in the right direction, but there is always more to be done. However,  the blame should not be on the average individual. Big corporations make up a substantial amount of the waste on our planet, and they should be held accountable. Although there are  regulations and laws being passed, there are also actions  the average individual can take to do their part.

There are many things that can be done to eliminate millions of tons of waste. Recycling is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to being more sustainable.

In the Waste Management Hierarchy, the most preferred section begins with source reductions and reuse, then recycling/composting, then goes toward the least preferred section with energy recovery, and treatment & disposal.

Source reduction & reuse is a preventative method which limits what you bring into the waste stream. This includes shopping second-hand to reduce the intake of new items that will ultimately end up in a landfill. This could be anything from buying used appliances from Goodwill to taking old t-shirts and making a quilt out of it.

Recycling or Composting is next on the Waste Management Hierarchy. A lot of people recognize the act of recycling as a main goal in becoming a more sustainable person, but really that should be the bare minimum. Everyone should recycle (and recycle properly) and go up from there. Please refer to our resources (https://www.pinardwaste.com/residential-2/recycling/) to recycle properly with us or refer to waste360 (https://www.waste360.com/recycling).

Composting, on the other hand, is another practice that needs to be done properly for it to be effective. Resources to learn how to compost are also on waste360 (https://www.waste360.com/organics/composting). Mixing food in your trash is harmful for landfills and the environment. Roughly ⅓ of all the food we have never gets eaten and ends up thrown away (https://innovate-eco.com/what-happens-to-food-waste-in-landfills-the-full-environmental-impact). All that food then gets buried in landfills and the organic material is broken down without oxygen which is called anaerobic digestion. This creates greenhouse gases that are released into the atmosphere which adds to global warming. When composted in a proper circumstance, the food is broken down with oxygen in a process called aerobic digestion, which helps to avoid creating a by-product of greenhouse gases. When done properly, compost gets processed into natural fertilizer that can enrich the soil and environment.

Energy recovery is the conversion of non-recyclable waste into usable heat, electricity, or fuel, through the processes of combustion, gasification, pyrolization, and landfill gas recovery. This takes the greenhouse gases (mentioned above) and turns it into something useful instead of releasing them into the atmosphere. This process is out of an average individual’s hands, and puts the responsibility in the hands of corporations and landfill companies. If waste is reduced by a significant amount with the first two management techniques above, then energy recovery would be one of the last steps to make sure what waste does end up in a landfill is turned into something useful.

Lastly, Treatment & Disposal is the least preferred method of waste management. This refers to the end-of-life stage at landfills. Because the landfills are the last stop for any materials that are thrown out, they need to be treated as such. When organic materials are separated out of trash in the household, landfills run more smoothly. After the recovery of energy, landfills are then covered up and turned into parks and golf courses.

Being more sustainable with your waste starts at the top. You can stop your waste intake at the source by simply not buying new items that will ultimately end up in a landfill. Going down the Waste Management Hierarchy, you can recycle or compost all the waste that is eligible for either. If you need to throw things away, the landfills in which your waste ends up should be recovering all the energy it can to turn it into electricity or fuel we would normally be getting from someone else. And lastly, if you’ve done all you can, let’s make sure the treatment of a landfill is done properly and turned into something productive.

Industry Insight

Our Tips On Disposing PPE Properly

PPE or personal protective equipment has been a barrier between the Covid-19 virus and the general public for the last 12 months (and counting). Healthcare workers are not the only ones who use PPE or other sanitizing equipment. Over the last year, with the majority of the public using PPE, items have been disposed of improperly at an exorbitant number.

A majority of PPE and sanitizing equipment is single-use, which creates an overwhelming and uncharted amount of trash. Common PPE found littered or disposed of improperly includes gloves and face masks, bottles of hand sanitizer, sanitizing wipes, paper towels, and tissues.

As the pandemic approaches the one year mark, the damage to the environment as a result of PPE disposal continues to increase. By disposing of this waste properly and making substitutions when we can, we can mitigate this overflow of waste.

A majority of PPE and sanitizing equipment is single-use, which creates an overwhelming and uncharted amount of trash. Common PPE found littered or disposed of improperly includes gloves and face masks, bottles of hand sanitizer, sanitizing wipes, paper towels, and tissues.

As the pandemic approaches the one year mark, the damage to the environment as a result of PPE disposal continues to increase. By disposing of this waste properly and making substitutions when we can, we can mitigate this overflow of waste.

  • Single-use face masks
    NOT recyclable and need to be put in the trash. Before throwing them away, cut the strings that go around your ears so they don’t cause harm to wildlife.
  • Gloves
    NOT recyclable and need to be thrown out.
  • Plastic hand sanitizer bottles
    ARE recyclable (as long as they are bigger than the travel size). Just make sure they are empty before recycling.
  • Sanitizing wipes and tissues
    NOT recyclable and need to be thrown out.

When throwing out any PPE or sanitizing equipment, make sure they go in a trash bag that is tied at top to stop the spread of germs.

Some substitutions we recommend to reduce waste:

  • Buy reusable (and washable) face masks. Have a few handy that can be rotated every other day to be washed.
  • Buy hand sanitizer in bulk. This allows you to use less plastic and recycle the bigger bottles more easily.
  • Switch to a rag and spray sanitizer for inside your home so you can wash the rag and reduce waste.
  • Reduce your glove wearing, unless absolutely necessary, by washing your hands more often.

When in doubt, throw it out! Being unsure is okay, so do your research and be a part of the conversation. That is a great first step to taking care of each other and the environment around us. Once again, stay safe!

If you have any questions on how to dispose of waste properly, Pinard Waste Systems is always at your disposal! You can use the resources on our website or the resources at RecycleSmartNH.org.

Company Articles

Employee Spotlight: Ben Goldstein

Here at Pinard Waste Systems we attribute our success and continued growth to the loyalty and professionalism our employees pour into their roles here as a part of the extended family. There’s a reason we’re one of the largest, most trusted waste removal and recycling partners in New Hampshire, and, really, in the Northeast. From our start as a one truck operation back in 1963, to the full-fledged fleet we operate daily today, all the thanks goes to our dedicated team of drivers, administrative staff, and customer support representatives. At the end of the day, we strive to offer exemplary service, and timely remediation of all your waste and recycling removal needs.

With that said, we’d like to take a moment to place the spotlight on one of our team members, in what will be an ongoing series so you can get to know our family a little more!

Today’s spotlight:

Ben Goldstein – Residential Dispatcher

How long have you been working at Pinard Waste Systems, and what brought 
you here initially?

I have been working at Pinard for three years. I was moving back to New Hampshire and had seen a job posting from Pinard and thought I would apply because of my previous experience and love for the waste management industry.

What is your favorite thing about working at Pinard? What keeps you 
getting up and punching into work every morning?

My favorite thing about working at Pinard is my coworkers – office personnel and the drivers. What keeps me punching in every morning is my kids, and making sure customers are satisfied with our service.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers to know about you? What makes you, you?

I always put myself in both the driver and customer’s shoes so I can always help them out the best I can. I want to make sure they get off the phone happy. I am always on their side.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers
 to know about waste management and your work at Pinard Waste Systems?

It’s very important to know what products we take and how to dispose of them properly. They can always call with questions or concerns.

What makes waste management an essential service and what makes you
 proud to serve your customers’ waste remediation needs?

It helps keep the environment and earth clean; helps keep cities and towns clean which will aide in eliminating the chances of illness and some of the airborne viruses.

In your opinion, what is one thing we can all do to make the earth a cleaner, healthier place?

Recycle.

As a full-service company, Pinard Waste Systems offers solutions for commercial, industrial, residential, and municipal needs. Whether you need curbside collection, a dumpster for your business or home, a roll-off container for a construction job, a compactor, or a comprehensive recycling program, contact us and experience the difference a locally-owned, NH-based company can make. Our team will take great care of all your waste removal and recycling needs.

Company Articles

Employee Spotlight: Jeff Dunn

Here at Pinard Waste Systems we attribute our success and continued growth to the loyalty and professionalism our employees pour into their roles here as a part of the extended family. There’s a reason we’re one of the largest, most trusted waste removal and recycling partners in New Hampshire, and, really, in the Northeast. From our start as a one truck operation back in 1963, to the full-fledged fleet we operate daily today, all the thanks goes to our dedicated team of drivers, administrative staff, and customer support representatives. At the end of the day, we strive to offer exemplary service, and timely remediation of all your waste and recycling removal needs.

With that said, we’d like to take a moment to place the spotlight on one of our team members, in what will be an ongoing series so you can get to know our family a little more!

Today’s spotlight:

Jeff Dunn – Sales Representative

How long have you been working at Pinard Waste Systems, and what brought 
you here initially?

I came to Pinard Waste Systems six years ago because I was in need of a career change and Pinard offered me a change of pace and an interesting opportunity. So here we are, six years later…

What is your favorite thing about working at Pinard? What keeps you 
getting up and punching into work every morning?

I really enjoy the great group of people I work with. They are like family to me.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers to know about you? What makes you, you?

I appreciate all the opportunities I get to speak with our customers. I do what I can to make the sale of our service memorable for the customer in hopes of keeping great retention rates and earning their recommendation for further new business leads. I want us to be their first though when they need our waste removal service and recycling management.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers
 to know about waste management and your work at Pinard Waste Systems?

We all take a lot of pride in the service we provide to each and every one of our customers, whether you’ve been with us for a week, or a decade, or more (and everything in-between…)

What makes waste management an essential service and what makes you
 proud to serve your customers’ waste remediation needs?

Everybody has a waste and or recycling removal need. We are the people that can help with that need. And we take our work very seriously.

In your opinion, what is one thing we can all do to make the earth a cleaner, healthier place?

I hate to be a downer, but I don’t know what we can do at this point to reverse the damage we’ve already done. But, if we’re cognizant of our consumption habits and how we deal with the waste that comes from that, maybe we can help the environment in some way.

As a full-service company, Pinard Waste Systems offers solutions for commercial, industrial, residential, and municipal needs. Whether you need curbside collection, a dumpster for your business or home, a roll-off container for a construction job, a compactor, or a comprehensive recycling program, contact us and experience the difference a locally-owned, NH-based company can make. Our team will take great care of all your waste removal and recycling needs.

Company Articles

Employee Spotlight: Barry Berg

Here at Pinard Waste Systems we attribute our success and continued growth to the loyalty and professionalism our employees pour into their roles here as a part of the extended family. There’s a reason we’re one of the largest, most trusted waste removal and recycling partners in New Hampshire, and, really, in the Northeast. From our start as a one truck operation back in 1963, to the full-fledged fleet we operate daily today, all the thanks goes to our dedicated team of drivers, administrative staff, and customer support representatives. At the end of the day, we strive to offer exemplary service, and timely remediation of all your waste and recycling removal needs.

With that said, we’d like to take a moment to place the spotlight on one of our team members, in what will be an ongoing series so you can get to know our family a little more!

Today’s spotlight:

Barry Berg – Head Dispatcher

How long have you been working at Pinard Waste Systems, and what brought 
you here initially?

I’ve been here for two years and four months now. I came to Pinard originally due to the size of the company and the potential for growth.

What is your favorite thing about working at Pinard? What keeps you 
getting up and punching into work every morning?

My favorite things about coming to work every day are the customers and helping them with their needs, and my fellow employees.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers to know about you? What makes you, you?

I truly care about the customers’ rubbish needs. That may sound strange, but it is 100% true. I will go above and beyond to meet customer expectations. When they’re satisfied, I’m satisfied.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers
 to know about waste management and your work at Pinard Waste Systems?

Again, it’s first and foremost the idea that we care about the customer and making sure they’re needs have been met. The customer is not just a number here at Pinard, they’re our business and we care about each and every one of them. Without our customers there is no us. That’s the reality of this whole operation…

What makes waste management an essential service and what makes you
 proud to serve your customers’ waste remediation needs?

Well, I think the root of it for me is the idea that without waste management removal there would be health issues and rodent problems (which can lead to further health issues). Both would be out of control if not for our remediation services (and that of the industry as a whole).

In your opinion, what is one thing we can all do to make the earth a cleaner, healthier place?

Recycle. It would be nice if there were more outlets to recycle more products. We ought to work on that!

As a full-service company, Pinard Waste Systems offers solutions for commercial, industrial, residential, and municipal needs. Whether you need curbside collection, a dumpster for your business or home, a roll-off container for a construction job, a compactor, or a comprehensive recycling program, contact us and experience the difference a locally-owned, NH-based company can make. Our team will take great care of all your waste removal and recycling needs.

Company Articles

Employee Spotlight: Bob Silva

Here at Pinard Waste Systems we attribute our success and continued growth to the loyalty and professionalism our employees pour into their roles here as a part of the extended family. There’s a reason we’re one of the largest, most trusted waste removal and recycling partners in New Hampshire, and, really, in the Northeast. From our start as a one truck operation back in 1963, to the full-fledged fleet we operate daily today, all the thanks goes to our dedicated team of drivers, administrative staff, and customer support representatives. At the end of the day, we strive to offer exemplary service, and timely remediation of all your waste and recycling removal needs.

With that said, we’d like to take a moment to place the spotlight on one of our team members, in what will be an ongoing series so you can get to know our family a little more!

Today’s spotlight:

Bob Silva – Sales Manager

How long have you been working at Pinard Waste Systems, and what brought 
you here initially?

I’ve been with Pinard for nearly 25 years – a quarter century! I came at a friend’s recommendation and never left…

What is your favorite thing about working at Pinard? What keeps you 
getting up and punching into work every morning?

That’s easy… My love of the company and all the people that work there.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers to know about you? What makes you, you?

First and foremost, I’m honest – a straight shooter. I’ll tell you exactly what I think. Second, and just as important is that I’m here for them to help them through whatever they may need whenever they need it.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers
 to know about waste management and your work at Pinard Waste Systems?

Though we’re considered a large waste removal company here in New Hampshire, I actually consider us small in the sense that we serve the communities we live in. Support small local businesses that will, in turn, support you when you’re in need of support. Keeping your business local makes for stronger business relationships.

What makes waste management an essential service and what makes you
 proud to serve your customers’ waste remediation needs?

There will always be trash and we’re here and able to offer different options to our customer in order to help them make the best choice for whatever their need is.

In your opinion, what is one thing we can all do to make the earth a cleaner, healthier place?

Elect a new president, learn how to properly recycle, and wear your mask! 🙂

As a full-service company, Pinard Waste Systems offers solutions for commercial, industrial, residential, and municipal needs. Whether you need curbside collection, a dumpster for your business or home, a roll-off container for a construction job, a compactor, or a comprehensive recycling program, contact us and experience the difference a locally-owned, NH-based company can make. Our team will take great care of all your waste removal and recycling needs.

Industry Insight

As We All Lay Low, Household Waste Removal Spikes

It’s no secret that Covid-19 has kept many of us cooped up and in a state of isolation for the bulk of 2020. And, with no end in site, it’s looking to stay this way for quite a while – well into 2021 if we needed to make a prediction here…

And while you’re probably thinking we’re simply stating the obvious , what isn’t as obvious is the weight of responsibility a state of pandemic puts on a waste removal service such as us here at Pinard Waste Systems. With everyone hunkering down at home the uptick in residential waste is at record highs – which, by-and-large, makes absolute sense. Several months ago CNN reported that that increase in curbside waste removal was at 30%, which is a pretty astronomical. In Chicago and cities of similar size, that number creeps above 50%.

Why?

Well, it’s due to the fact that we’re literally stuck at home, so trash we might have been discarding of at other places now winds up in our own bins. And, for those that have long relied on “eating out” as a mode of daily sustenance, takeout waste (containers and the like) are seeing increased usage as people utilize “contactless” takeout services. That packaging is quite bulky, and, as such, fills bins quicker and more substantially.

So, as you might suspect, waste removal routes have slowed in some areas as increased loads equal more offloading to remediate overfilling the fleet of trucks. It’s a burden, but there’s quite literally no way around it. When it’s full, it’s full. It’s like trying to stuff that last bit of trash into an overfilled can – you’re either tearing the bag, or said item is falling to the floor. Either way, you’re making quite a mess. As stated, when it’s full, it’s full. Same goes for a truck hauling waste from its respective route.

That’s not to say waste removal companies are looking for some kind of pity. We aren’t. We’re proud of the fact that we’re an essential service. You’re relying on us to keep things tidy in an untidy world. And, we’ve always been ready to serve. That said, if things seem a bit slow at times, it’s not that we’re not coming, as they, say, “patience is a virtue,” and we’ll be there! We can guarantee that. It’s that it’s taking a little bit longer than we’ve all grown accustomed to in the past. We’re on the frontlines and we will be from now until forever. Pinard Waste Removal is always at your disposal.

Stay safe, and be well!

Company Articles

Employee Spotlight: Dave Palomba

Here at Pinard Waste Systems we attribute our success and continued growth to the loyalty and professionalism our employees pour into their roles here as a part of the extended family. There’s a reason we’re one of the largest, most trusted waste removal and recycling partners in New Hampshire, and, really, in the Northeast. From our start as a one truck operation back in 1963, to the full-fledged fleet we operate daily today, all the thanks goes to our dedicated team of drivers, administrative staff, and customer support representatives. At the end of the day, we strive to offer exemplary service, and timely remediation of all your waste and recycling removal needs.

With that said, we’d like to take a moment to place the spotlight on one of our team members, in what will be an ongoing series so you can get to know our family a little more!

Today’s spotlight:

Dave Palomba – Dispatch & Operations Support

How long have you been working at Pinard Waste Systems, and what brought 
you here initially?

I have been with Pinard Waste Systems for four months now. I was a senior transportation coordinator for a livery company that was crippled by Uber and then Covid-19, so I needed to find a new opportunity. I knew that trash will never go away, so I wanted to get into a more essential industry. Pinard was the perfect choice.

What is your favorite thing about working at Pinard? What keeps you 
getting up and punching into work every morning?

My favorite thing about working at Pinard is that I’m involved with almost every department. So, every day I get to do something a little different and learn something new, which I appreciate.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers to know about you? What makes you, you?

My position is to effectively and efficiently get trash off the ground. I’m also involved with a restructuring of Pinard’s services to make our commitment to our customers even stronger than before. The future looks bright.

What is one thing you want your current customers / potential customers
 to know about waste management and your work at Pinard Waste Systems?

Working behind the scenes for a waste management company has been really eye-opening. There are rule and regulations for waste disposal that seem insignificant, but have big effects on the industry. Following the trash and recycling programs that Pinard issues customers can help both sides effectively dispose of each commodity correctly.

What makes waste management an essential service and what makes you
 proud to serve your customers’ waste remediation needs?

There is always going to be waste. If we can work together to make sure we manage it correctly and safely, we can be assured that we are doing the right thing for our customers.

In your opinion, what is one thing we can all do to make the earth a cleaner, healthier place?

Everyone always talks about global warming, littering, and recycling. If we follow all recommendations, guidelines, and programs put in place for effective waste management practices, we can maybe make a dent in keeping earth clean.

As a full-service company, Pinard Waste Systems offers solutions for commercial, industrial, residential, and municipal needs. Whether you need curbside collection, a dumpster for your business or home, a roll-off container for a construction job, a compactor, or a comprehensive recycling program, contact us and experience the difference a locally-owned, NH-based company can make. Our team will take great care of all your waste removal and recycling needs.